Propagating Lavender from Cuttings the Quick and Easy Way!

Propagating lavender from cuttings is one of those really easy and rewarding garden pleasures.  Not only do you get more plants but it is just plain fun to grow more for free.

Propagating lavender from cuttings is such an easy and fun way to get more. Create a hedge of this sweet-smelling, pollinator magnet on a budget.

Lavender is a flowering plant that you can grow in your garden or even in containers. It has many uses, but one of the most popular is to use it for its scent. Lavender’s smell is so strong and pleasant, that it can be used as an aromatherapy oil for relaxation.

If you want to enjoy lavender in your own garden, then propagating it from cuttings is a great way to go! Read on to find out how you can propagate lavender from cuttings!

I have shared my propagation addiction before, Lilacs, Roses, Clematis, Delphiniums and Geraniums, to name a few. Today we will focus on how to propagate lavender from cuttings.

I have included a full video version of this at the end of the post.  If you so wish, please subscribe to my new YouTube channel which is dedicated to gardening and DIY.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

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Mother Lavender Plant

The photo above is the mother plant.  This is what I take my cuttings from and from a daughter of this plant (below) that I had started a couple of years ago.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

Yes, that photo above is of an actual lavender plant that I started from a cutting.  I am attempting to create a lavender topiary and so far so good, even if it is a slow process.  It is very green right now, that is new Spring growth, as it matures it will turn the typical grey-green you see on many lavender plants.

Taking Lavender Cuttings

To take cuttings you can use the new growth as well as some more mature growth (not too woody but woodier than the really green ones). Notice in the photo below that a couple are greener than the others. That is because I took the new growth off the plant above to make cuttings which overwintered in my greenhouse.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

The darker ones are from my outside plant and they were a bit more mature.  Below is the twig or branch I snapped off of the outside plant.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

I pinch or cut the little side shoots off the main stem. You can actually try to root the hardwood stem but that takes much longer than the newer growth.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

Prepare Lavender Cuttings

The cuttings you took of the main stem now need to have the lower leaves stripped off.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

I pinch them off with my thumbnail or use a sharp knife.  Above you see the stems with leaves and below the lower part now is leafless.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

Dip Lavender Cuttings in Rooting Hormone

Dip the bare part into rooting hormone (optional, some say this is not necessary and I have not tested it without rooting hormone yet to say if it works for me). Rooting hormone is supposed to speed up the rooting process.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

I have this little votive candle holder and it works great for shorter things like these cuttings.   I have used both liquid and powder forms of rooting hormone. Right now this one is working well for me.

Potting Medium for Lavender Cuttings

I use my own DIY potting soil with added horticultural sand to loosen it. See my DIY potting soil recipe here. It not only saves money but there are no plastic bags to throw away, so more environmentally friendly too. I have a friend who prefers using horticultural sand and has great results. So there are some options to choose from.

Fill your small pot with potting soil and water it in. (if buying a potting mix for this I like to use a Cactus potting mix for my lavenders)

With a pencil or stick about the size of a pencil poke holes into your damp soil around the edge of the pot.  Now tuck the cuttings into the holes and press the soil in around them.

Propagating Lavender from Cuttings, so easy and fun. You can create an entire lavender hedge with just one plant! I will show you how!

There are two schools of thought on why next to the edge of the pot is better than the center.  One is when it is up against the edge it will cause some roots to grow laterally rather than all straight down and the other is they tend to dry out less quickly when up against the edge.

I cannot attest to either theory but I do know that it is easier to separate them if they are along the edge once they do root and you can start more in a small pot. This is a 4-inch plastic pot, I also have some in a terra cotta pot of the same size.   The greener, newer shoots usually will get roots first.

Cover Potted up Cuttings

I place them in a mini greenhouse like the one shown here, this keeps the air around them moist but the little vent on top keeps some air flowing too.

I find it easier than using a plastic bag.  If the pot is large enough you can also use a jar as I did here, you would just need to leave enough space on the edge for the jar to sit. (In this case, you would not have the cuttings around the outer edge of the pot)

Providing a cover for cuttings like this is optional. Some say that lavenders prefer drier conditions and thus don’t need the cover. You choose which way you want to go.

Before you know it you will have enough lavender to create a hedge.  Can you imagine the beautiful scent!

Please Note: There are many varieties of Lavender. Some are hardier than others. Find which ones can be used in your climate as perennials. Also check the average height the Lavender variety can get. This will tell you if it will make a good hedge or not.

Many lavender can live for a long, long time if grown in the right conditions. On a trip not long ago we toured an old garden in Monterey, California and it had a lavender in it that was over 100 years old.


Supply list:
Plastic Pots
Mini Greenhouse Dome lid
Rooting hormone
Potting Soil
Pruners

Lavender with text overlay, Propagate Lavender from Cuttings, youtube play button overlay

More Lavender posts I know you will enjoy!
How to Use Lavender
Blueberry Jam with Lavender & Honey
Create a Lavender Hedge
Make a Lavender Wreath

Happy Gardening!

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8 Comments

  1. Love this I have a lavender plant that I want to propagate next. This has become my favorite gardening activity or possibly yes an addiction. We’re moving so this is how I decided to bring my garden with me.. Thanks for sharing.

    1. I must confess, I have as much fun propagating plants as I do gardening in general. I don’t know why. 🙂 Maybe because my very first personal garden I started was as a new bride in my new home, we were on a super tight budget but the little town where we lived was filled with generous older ladies that had beautiful little cottage gardens. They shared with me cuttings from their gardens, seedlings from volunteer Japanese Maples that would pop up under their trees and extra bulbs, rhizomes or tubers. So I think I got hooked then. That was a hard garden to leave behind when I moved.

  2. Wow! I had no idea Lavender could grow from cuttings. I bought one last month and it’s in a pot near my raised bed veggie garden. I’m definitely going to try this! Thanks for sharing …and I LOVE your greenhouse!

  3. Thanks for the tips for propagating. Beside the fact that your instructions help with the garden budget, you can be sure you are getting another of the same plant you love. It is so easy to pick up and purchase a similar plant that is not quite what you want! (Yes, I have done that.).

    1. Yes, that is the one of the best incentives to propagate from cuttings or root divisions.

  4. This is a perfect segment for me today.
    I have about 4 lavender plants in my front yard. They are about 3-4 years old.
    I want to dig them up and transfer them to another part of my yard, when is a good time to do this?
    Enjoy the info on this blog…thank you
    Rosie

    1. I just dug one of mine up yesterday and replanted. It depends upon your weather and conditions. We are having a mild spell so it was a perfect time to do it. We won’t be getting any super frigid temps in the near future so the one I transplanted should do great. If your ground is not frozen and you are not in an area that is going to be hit hard with super cold you can do it now. If not now then early Spring before it gets hot.

  5. How often do you have to water the cuttings of lavender?

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