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Reviving Potted Petunias

How to revive leggy potted petunias that are looking spindly. Pruning your petunias can bring them back to looking full and lush once again. Super simple and you get a bonus from them if you choose!

Learn how reviving potted petunias can make for more beautiful blooms all summer long! About mid-summer petunias can start to look very spindly and sad. Give your petunias a good prune, a bit of feed, and plenty of water. Refreshing your spent, leggy petunias brings them back to their full glory for months.  Petunia maintenance 101. 

Reviving your potted petunias and other annuals that may look like they are ready to give up the ghost. Refurbishing potted annuals is not hard but the rewards are more luscious blooms for the rest of the summer through Fall.

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I bought these large hanging potted petunias at a wholesale nursery in May.  They were big and luscious, full of purple and white petunias.  Diligently I watered and fed with an organic liquid plant food over the next weeks. I thoroughly enjoyed the gorgeousness they added to my side porch.

But after a while I noticed they seemed to be suffering, looking wilted and pathetic.  I watered some more, thinking that maybe I just wasn’t keeping up with their needs.  After all, we were having an early heatwave and it was dang hot!  (which I love)

Reviving Potted Petunias

No matter how much I watered they did not bounce back.  I checked for spider mites (nasty little critters) and other infestations but they were clean.  Just ugly.

basket of leggy petunias that need reviving

The Problem

I felt the soil and noticed it was like a brick. The petunias were not only root bound but the soil used for the hanging basket had turned into a rock.  This can happen when peat moss is used in container mixes. It compresses and becomes a brick.

The soil has become what is called hydrophobic. This means it resists absorbing water thus the plants don’t get what they need.

Thankfully this is simple to fix.

To avoid this situation when I pot up my own hanging baskets I don’t use peat moss, I make sure there is plenty of substance added to my potting soil to keep it loose and free draining.  Additives like perlite (the little white pebble-looking things in good potting soil) works wonders. For my complete DIY Potting soil recipe, visit this post

The Fix for Bedraggled Petunias

Give the plants a good soak.  Take a Garden knife shove the blade down into the moistened brick of soil in the pot.  I wiggle it to make holes throughout the solid chunk of soil.

Reviving your potted petunias and other annuals that may look like they are ready to give up the ghost. Refurbishing potted annuals is not hard but the rewards are more luscious blooms for the rest of the summer through Fall.

I add some fresh good quality potting soil then water it in so it filters down into the spaces I created with the knife.

Reviving your potted petunias and other annuals that may look like they are ready to give up the ghost. Refurbishing potted annuals is not hard but the rewards are more luscious blooms for the rest of the summer through Fall.

Get Tough

I cut back this petunia plant severely.  All the way to the rim of the pot.

If you are just doing a refurbishing prune-up (many annual potted plants may need one about mid-summer) and they don’t look as sorry as these specimens, you can cut back to about the bottom of the pot and it is enough. You can use those cuttings to start more Petunias if you like, I show you how here.

But reviving potted petunias that have gotten this sorry need a more drastic haircut.  So I whacked them off to the rim of the pot.  I figured it was do or die.  As awful as they were looking it could only go up from here.

Reviving your potted petunias and other annuals that may look like they are ready to give up the ghost. Refurbishing potted annuals is not hard but the rewards are more luscious blooms for the rest of the summer through Fall.

Patiently Wait

I hung them back up and kept up with watering and feeding.  My roses climbing the porch posts were in full bloom and stealing the show anyway so the petunia baskets just showing a bit of green was not a huge loss for the time being.

What do you think happened?  Did they kick up their toes and call it quits?

Well, you be the judge.

Reviving your potted petunias and other annuals that may look like they are ready to give up the ghost. Refurbishing potted annuals is not hard but the rewards are more luscious blooms for the rest of the summer through Fall.

This transformation from pathetic stubby stems to gorgeous blooms took about 3 weeks and they continued to grow and bloom the rest of the summer.

So the moral of the story…. don’t be afraid to prune up if you need to revive or refresh your potted petunias (or other annuals).

Reviving your potted petunias and other annuals that may look like they are ready to give up the ghost. Refurbishing potted annuals is not hard but the rewards are more luscious blooms for the rest of the summer through Fall.

No need to do such a drastic complete prune back if you keep up with it from day one. Deadhead regularly and cut back at least a third of the stems every other week, even if they have buds on them.

This will keep the petunias from only blooming at the ends and you keep it lush and full of blooms from the top.

In this video, I show you step by step.

revive leggy petunias vid post

Many of the Supertunias from Proven Winners don’t usually need this kind of pruning as often but it keeps them looking the very best too.

I wish you all bounteous blooms in your gardens.

Leggy petunias getting pruned to revive them

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