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How to Grow Black Eyed Susans easily

Want to grow a flower that will perform from mid summer until frost?  Read on and learn how to grow black eyed susans (aka: Rudbeckia) easily in your cottage garden. Some folks also call them Brown Eyed Susans.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans.  An easy cottage garden favorite that will reseed itself and fill your garden with beautiful long lasting blooms during the heat of Summer.

Black Eyed Susans, Daisies and Feverfew with text overlay, How to Grow Black Eyed Susans

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Why I love to Grow Black Eyed Susans!

I can’t say that I have a favorite garden flower, but I can say that Black Eyed Susans are ‘one’ of my favorites, especially in the late-summer. 

Black eyed susans are so easy to grow and light up the garden with bright yellow flowers that fairly glow when many other flowers are fading away.

Black Eyed Susans (Rudbeckia) come in many shapes, sizes and colors and now I have learned they have even crossed them with Echinacea for a variety called Echibeckia.   I have yet to give that one a try.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans in your Cottage Garden, also known as Rudbeckia, easy and fast spreading for a wow of bright color! FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

Once established they are drought tolerant and resistant to most insects.  The deer don’t seem to like eating them either. I think it may be the spiky fuzzy leaves.

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My favorite pure yellow black eyed susan is called Indian Summer.  The form of the petals is more rounded and the yellow contrasts so dramatically with the dark brown center.  Sometimes the center has a purple cast which I find so appealing. 

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans from Seed

You can directly seed Black Eyed Susan’s 2 to 4 weeks before your average last frost, or if starting indoors 6 to 8 weeks before.  They are said to be hardy in zones 3 or 4 through 9.

Black Eyed Susans are a fantastic candidate for Winter Sowing. A quick and easy way to get tons of them. 

Related: Sow Your Seeds in Fall

Personally, I have succeeded in direct seeding them all summer long right up until nearly our first Fall frost.  Be sure to read the seed packets they can give you even more info.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

Plant seedlings out in the garden once sturdy enough and before the temps get very hot. Let them get established before they have to put up with the intense heat.

I have varieties that are such wonderful burnt oranges and ambers as well..this mix is called Autumn Gloriosa Blend.  I love how sometimes it is the center that has the splash of deeper color and others it is on the petal tips.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

Many Shades of yellows reads and oranges for variety!

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

Caring for Black Eyed Susans

Tough as nails once established black eyed susans will tolerate drought and fill in fabulously.

Keep in mind some watering will get you a longer bloom time but too much water will make them grow too gangling and they tend to flop over.  

Frequent cutting for bouquets will keep it tidy and re-blooming. Sometimes you will need to stake them.

They do well in pots, I keep some on my back deck from bright color.

Old rustic ladder draped in Fall. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

There are a variety of sizes and shapes. Some blossoms are large and spread as wide as my hand.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

Others are short and stubby but just as lovely.  There are some dwarf varieties that are bred to stay shorter and stockier.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

Transplanting full grown Black Eyed Susans

This self seeding perennial/biennial is so diverse and easy that typically I don’t transplant but you can if you do it in early Spring.  

If you must dig it up a black eyed susan when it is later in the Summer you can put the plant into a pot and keep it well watered and in the shade until it has recovered from the shock of being dug up.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

I absolutely love my doubles.  Sometimes a plant will have both double flowers and single flowers on it.  

Click here for some seed from Amazon Gloriosa Daisy and Burpee has seeds for the double flowered variety here  Gloriosa Double Gold.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

As I let mine all grow together the seeds cross pollinate and I get even more variations.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans, easy flowers for your cottage garden. Easily reseeds for years of enjoyment and ease. FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com

It is fun to see what will come up next.

Black-Eyed-Susan-Mix-FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com_.com-49-of-51.jpg

They easily grow in the hard packed earth of the roadside or clay soil and flourish.

Black-Eyed-Susan-roadside.jpg

Bees and Butterflies flock to them and in the Fall and Winter the seed heads serve as food for many birds.

Black-Eyed-Susans-front-FlowerPatchFarmhouse.com_.jpg

They blend so nicely with all the other flowers and make my cottage garden a bright spot in the neighborhood.
They can get powdery mildew but though that can look a bit untidy it does not seem to affect the blooms at all so I just ignore it. There are some varieties that seem to be more resistant than others.

I confess to being a lazy gardener as I shared in this series…Lazy Gal’s Garden, I love flowers that volunteer to grow (aka:reseed themselves and grow like weeds) therefore I love Black Eyed Susans!
Most of these are volunteers in my garden.

How to Grow Black Eyed Susans,

Very few did I specifically plant.

You can’t ask much more from a flower than they take care of themselves and give such a stellar performance.

Black Eye Susan Amber12

If you would like to read a bit of history about the Black Eyed Susan just click HERE
I found it quite interesting.
I have a couple varieties on my wish list, one is Sahara and the other is Denver Daisy.

Update, I have my Denver Daisy

Denver Daisy Black Eyed Susans


Happy Gardening everyone and have a GREAT day!

  • Grow in Sun (they can tolerate some shade but will become tall and reach for the sunshine, you would need to stake them)
  • Direct seed in Spring or Fall (just toss on the soil and cover in a scant 8th inch of soil, though I just toss them down on top of the soil), Winter Sow in Containers or start indoors
  • Water until established then they are drought tolerant
  • Some are prone to powdery mildew but it doesn’t seem to hurt the blooms
  • Great for poor or clay soils
  • Pollinator magnet
  • Seed heads make great wild bird food
  • Great for a cutting garden
  • Deer Resistant
Rudbeckia, Black Eyed Susans with text overlay, grow the best black eyed susans, flower patch farmhouse
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patricia

Sunday 30th of June 2019

The deer eat the flower buds out of my sister's black-eyed susans drastically.

I have so many plants, I dug up and took to work to share. Some of them have gotten so tall; I think too tall to transplant. Can I cut them way back before planting? Will they still grow and bloom? Or is it too late to cut and transplant after they have grown about 18 inches tall?

Pamela

Sunday 30th of June 2019

You can try it and see. They are a bit finicky about being moved this time of year but I do think they will live on with lots of TLC. They just won't look good for awhile.

Dee

Monday 19th of November 2018

Can't wait to have these beauty's in our garden! Thanks for the info! See you Tuesday.

Pamela

Tuesday 20th of November 2018

My pleasure, entirely!

Jackie Sons

Monday 13th of August 2018

We have thousands growing on a hillside on our property. We moved here about 4 years ago, so we really do not know if they are growing wild or if a previous owner planted them. Either way they are beautiful! Such a great bloom of color especially with Fall fast approaching.

Pamela

Monday 13th of August 2018

And they are super easy to pull up if you get too many. I have them come up all over the garden but I don't mind since they are super easy to pull.

Linda Sue

Friday 27th of July 2018

I love black eyed Susan’s and hav them in my garden. My dad said I was named after the flower. What are the purple flowers you have mixed with them?

Pamela

Monday 30th of July 2018

those are larkspur. I also have delphiniums mixed in.

Peggy Z

Saturday 21st of July 2018

I need to look for the doubles. I have a soft spot for these happy yellow flowers. An elderly lady that lived across from the office I worked out always had a big border of black eyed Susan’s. When nothing else grew, she always had black eyed Susan’s and iris. Your yard is gorgeous.

Pamela

Sunday 22nd of July 2018

They are such an easy no fuss flower to grow, at least for me. You can't go wrong with that.

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